MyAnimals

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<h1>Animals Around the World</h1>
<h2>Welcome! Here we have some of the uncommon animals located around the world!</h2>
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<p>White-faced saki <i>(Pithecia pithecia)</i> 
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<img src="http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e101/ShadowRacerX/800px-Pithecia_pithecia_zpsfwrsavqo.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo 800px-Pithecia_pithecia_zpsfwrsavqo.jpg" width="500" length="200"/><p>The <b>white-faced saki</b> <i>(Pithecia pithecia)</i>, also known as the <b>Guianan saki</b> and the <b>golden-faced saki</b>, is a species of saki monkey, a type of New World monkey, found in Brazil, French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname and Venezuela. <p>This species lives in the understory and lower canopy of the forest, feeding mostly on fruits, but also eating nuts, seeds, and insects. These monkeys can be found in various zoos such as Lincoln Park Zoo, Oregon Zoo, Philidelphia, etc.
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<p> King Penguin <i>(Aptenodytes patagonicus)</i>
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<img src="http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e101/ShadowRacerX/image2_zpszqmsqyos.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo image2_zpszqmsqyos.jpg" width="500" length="200"/><p>The <b>king penguin</b><i> (Aptenodytes patagonicus)</i> is the second largest species of penguin at 70 to 100 cm tall and weighs 11 to 16 kg (24 to 35 lb). In size it is second only to the emperor penguin. There are two subspecies—A. p. patagonicus and A. p. halli; patagonicus is found in the South Atlantic and halli elsewhere.
<p>King penguins eat small fish, mainly lanternfish, and squid and rely less than most Southern Ocean predators on krill and other crustaceans. On foraging trips they repeatedly dive to over 100 metres (330 ft), and have been recorded at depths greater than 300 metres (980 ft). These penguins can be found in zoos such as, Pittsburgh Zoo, Detroit Zoo, etc.
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<p>Silvery lutung <i>(Trachypithecus cristatus)</i></p><img src="http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e101/ShadowRacerX/images_zps5v86gayq.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo images_zps5v86gayq.jpg" width="500" length="200"/>
<p>The <b>silvery langur</b> <i>(Trachypithecus cristatus)</i>, also known as the silvered leaf monkey or the silvery lutung, is an Old World monkey. It is arboreal, living in coastal, mangrove, and riverine forests in Peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and Borneo.
<p>The silvery langur is a medium-sized monkey with a long, non-prehensile tail. It has grey-tipped, dark brown or black fur, giving it a uniform silvery appearance. Unlike some related species, there are no paler markings on the face or body, except for a patch of whitish hair on the groin of females. A crest of fur runs along the top of the head, and the hair on the cheeks is long, often obscuring the ears. The hands and feet are hairless, with dark coloured skin, and have opposable thumbs and toes. They can be found in zoos such as, Cincinnati Zoo, etc.
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<p>Gila monster<i> (Heloderma suspectum)</i></p>
<img src="http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e101/ShadowRacerX/220px-Gila_monster2_zpsdfy07vwp.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo 220px-Gila_monster2_zpsdfy07vwp.jpg"/ width="500" length="200">  
<p>The <b>Gila Monster</b><i> (Heloderma suspectum</i>, is a species of venomous lizard native to the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexican state of Sonora. A heavy, slow-moving lizard, up to 60 cm (2.0 ft) long, the Gila monster is the only venomous lizard native to the United States and one of only two known species of venomous lizards in North America, the other being its close relative, the Mexican beaded lizard (H. horridum). <p>Though the Gila monster is venomous, its sluggish nature means it represents little threat to humans. However, it has earned a fearsome reputation and is sometimes killed despite being protected by state law in Arizona. They can be found in zoos such as Philidelphia Zoo, Saint Louis Zoo, etc.</p>
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<p>Wallaroo <i>(M. Robustus)</i></p>
<img src="http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e101/ShadowRacerX/220px-Macropus_robustus_zpsfmauaxgs.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo 220px-Macropus_robustus_zpsfmauaxgs.jpg" width="500" length="200"/>
<p>A <b>Wallaroo</b> is any of three closely related species of moderately large macropod, intermediate in size between the kangaroos and the wallabies. The word "wallaroo" is from <b>Dharug walaru</b>. <p>In general, a large, slim-bodied macropod of the open plains is called a "kangaroo"; a small to medium-sized one, particularly if it is relatively thick-set, is a "wallaby": most wallaroos are only a little smaller than a kangaroo, fairly thickset, and are found in open country. <p>All share a particular habit of stance: wrists raised, elbows tucked close into the body, and shoulders thrown back, and all have a large, black-skinned rhinarium. They can be found in Oakland Zoo.</p>
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<p>Bison <i>(Bovinae)</i></p>
<img src="http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e101/ShadowRacerX/800px-Americanbison_zpsyu0lfuah.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo 800px-Americanbison_zpsyu0lfuah.jpg" width="500" length="200"/>
<p><b>Bison</b> or buffalo are large, even-toed ungulates in the genus Bison within the subfamily <i>Bovinae</i>.

<p>Two extant and four extinct species are recognized. Of the four extinct species, three were North American: <i>Bison antiquus, B. latifrons, and B. occidentalis</i>. The fourth, <i>B. priscus</i>, ranged across steppe environments from Western Europe, through Central Asia, East Asia including Japan, and onto North America.

<p>Of the two surviving species, the American bison, B. bison, found only in North America, is the more numerous. Although sometimes referred to historically as a "buffalo", it is only distantly related to the true buffalo. The North American species is composed of two subspecies, the plains bison, B. b. bison, and the wood bison, B. b. athabascae, which is the namesake of Wood Buffalo National Park in Canada.</p>
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<p>Meerkat <i>(Suricata suricatta)</i></p>
<img src="http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e101/ShadowRacerX/Meerkat_Suricata_suricatta_Tswalu_zpsnhrmzwxk.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo Meerkat_Suricata_suricatta_Tswalu_zpsnhrmzwxk.jpg" width="500" length="200"/>
<p>The <b>meerkat</b> or <b>suricate</b> <i>(Suricata suricatta)</i> is a small carnivoran belonging to the mongoose family <i>(Herpestidae)</i>. It is the only member of the genus <i>Suricata</i>. Meerkats live in all parts of the Kalahari Desert in Botswana, in much of the Namib Desert in Namibia and southwestern Angola, and in South Africa. 
<p>A group of meerkats is called a "mob", "gang" or "clan". A meerkat clan often contains about 20 meerkats, but some super-families have 50 or more members. In captivity, meerkats have an average life span of 12–14 years, and about half this in the wild. They can be found in San Diego Zoo and National Park.</p>
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<p>Muntjac <i>(Muntiacus)</i></p>
<img src="http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e101/ShadowRacerX/220px-Muntiacus_sp_-_Hai_Hong_Karni_zpsegi21r8k.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo 220px-Muntiacus_sp_-_Hai_Hong_Karni_zpsegi21r8k.jpg" width="500" length="200"/>
<p><b>Muntjacs</b>, also known as <b>barking deer</b> and <b>Mastreani deer</b>, are small deer of the genus <i>Muntiacus</i>. Muntjacs are the oldest known deer, thought to have begun appearing 15–35 million years ago, with remains found in Miocene deposits in France, Germany and Poland.
<p>The present-day species are native to South Asia and can be found in India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, the Indonesian islands, Taiwan and Southern China. They are also found in the lower Himalayas (Terai regions of Nepal and Bhutan) and in some areas of Japan (the Boso Peninsula and Ōshima Island). They can also be found in Norfolk england. 
          <p>Muntjac are of great interest in evolutionary studies because of their dramatic chromosome variations and the recent discovery of several new species. The Indian muntjac <i>(M. muntjak)</i> is the mammal with the lowest recorded chromosome number. They can be found in San Diego Zoo and Atlanta Zoo.</p>
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<p>Black Rhinoceros <i>(Diceros bicornis)</i><p>
<img src="http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e101/ShadowRacerX/Diceros_bicornis_Etosha_zpstwkvrepz.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo Diceros_bicornis_Etosha_zpstwkvrepz.jpg"/ width="500" length="200"/>
  <p>The <b>black rhinoceros</b> or <b>hook-lipped rhinoceros</b> <i>(Diceros bicornis)</i> is a species of rhinoceros, native to eastern and southern Africa including Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Although the rhinoceros is referred to as black, its colors vary from brown to grey.

<p>The other African rhinoceros is the white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). The word "white" in the name "white rhinoceros" is often said to be a misinterpretation of the Afrikaans word wyd (Dutch wijd) meaning wide, referring to its square upper lip, as opposed to the pointed or hooked lip of the black rhinoceros. These species are now sometimes referred to as the square-lipped (for white) or hook-lipped (for black) rhinoceros.

<p>The species overall is classified as critically endangered, and three subspecies, one including the western black rhinoceros, were declared extinct by the IUCN in 2011.</p>
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<p>Green Tree Python <i>(Morelia viridis)</i></p>
<img src="http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e101/ShadowRacerX/220px-Morelia-viridis_zpsfo5wlkdh.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo 220px-Morelia-viridis_zpsfo5wlkdh.jpg" width="500" length="200"/>
  <p><i>Morelia viridis</i>, commonly known as the <b>green tree python</b>, or as it is known in the herpetoculture hobby, chondro (due to its former classification in the genus Chondropython) is a species of python found in New Guinea, islands in Indonesia, and Cape York Peninsula in Australia.
<p>he green tree python is characterized by a relatively slim body. The relatively long tail accounts for about 14% of the total length. The head is large and clearly defined from the neck. The snout is large and angular. The body is triangular in cross section with a visible spine. The species usually reaches a total length of 150–180 cm (4.9–5.9 ft), but large females may reach 200 cm (6.6 ft). The size also varies depending on the region of origin. The weight is highly dependent upon the nutritional status of the animal. Males can weigh about 1,100–1,400 g (2.4–3.1 lb), females up to 1,600 g (3.5 lb), although wild specimens are typically much lighter than this. Especially large specimens that can weigh up to 2,200 g (4.9 lb) are invariably females, which like most snakes are slightly larger and heavier than males. They can be found in zoos such as Detroit Zoo and Lincoln Zoo.
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<p>© All reserved 2016
<p>Mark Daniel Viray
  
  

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